A A A A

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College News

Business Safety and Security Topic for Small Business Week May14 at Rowan-Cabarrus

“Is Your Business Prepared for An Emergency?”

 

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — Rowan-Cabarrus Community College’s Small Business Center will help business owners prepare for the unexpected with a new special event entitled “Is Your Business Prepared for an Emergency?” Attendees will have a chance to talk with security experts and law enforcement personnel on Wednesday, May 14, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Rowan-Cabarrus N.C. Research Campus building in Kannapolis.

“Businesses around the world are experiencing heightened threats to their security and existence ranging from data breaches, burglary, employee theft, workplace violence, and even natural disasters,” said Barbara Hall, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Small Business Center director. “We wanted to offer this event to give small business owners first-hand knowledge on how to help protect their business from the unimaginable.”

The event will feature Tonya Barber, assistant vice president and security and information security officer at F&M Bank. Barber has over 20 years of law enforcement experience beginning her career with the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office. She continued to rise through the ranks to a major crimes investigator and hostage negotiator and has handled white collar crimes, computer crimes, background investigations, crisis management, criminal and civil law procedures. Barber will cover the ins and outs of corporate account fraud.

Also presenting are Captain John Sifford with the Rowan County Sheriff’s Office, Detective Chris Smith with the Concord Police Department, and Brian Decker, vice president of Operational Resources International, Inc. Operational Resources International is a Pittsburg, Penn.-based business. As a retired sergeant from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD), Decker will share his expertise on workplace violence. He served for 27 years with CMPD, 25 years as a member of the bomb squad. Decker is also a certified criminal justice instructor for the state Criminal Justice and Standards Commission.

The $10 registration fee includes lunch. Registration information is at www.rccc.edu/sbc or call 704-216-3941. The College’s NCRC facility is located at 399 Biotechnology Lane, in Kannapolis. For additional information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

Posted in Small Business Center | Tagged , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Reduces Test Fee for GED

Fee reduced from $30 for each of the four tests down to $20 per test

SALISBURY, N.C. — While 2014 brought a completely new GED test and increased fees, there has been some relief for test-takers. Thanks to a new arrangement between the GED Testing Service and the North Carolina Community College system, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College has been able to lower the cost per exam from $30.00 to $20.00 for each of the four tests that make up the high school equivalency.

This fee change, a reduction of $10 per test, will take place this summer once all of the 58 community colleges have completed the necessary paperwork.

2013 marked an important year for the College to reach adults without a high school diploma or GED. Rowan-Cabarrus committed to help local individuals finish the GED testing process before testing fees increased.

Last year, in order to meet student needs, the College personally reached out to every adult in Rowan and Cabarrus counties who had not yet received their high school diploma or GED. To encourage the community to act before the changes took place, the College held a “one-day only” event where the College paid the test fee for interested individuals.

The effort paid off with nearly 630 local residents completing their GED in 2013. This is the largest number of GED graduates that the College has served in about ten years since the closing of Pillowtex. Further, this group of GED graduates represents the largest percentage of students moving directly onto to college courses at Rowan-Cabarrus.

As part of the College’s efforts to keep costs as low as possible, Rowan-Cabarrus has been offering students who enroll in the GED program the option to apply for funding that would cover the cost of the test fees.

“I don’t want students to abandon their GED efforts because of a cost factor,” said Gary Connor, director of the College’s GED and Adult Basic Education programs.

Rowan-Cabarrus provides both instruction and resource materials to students preparing for the GED at no cost. Classes are scheduled on the North and South Campuses and at a variety of community locations for convenience and access.

“Our goal is to bring education to the students. It’s our ‘meet them where they are philosophy,’” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of Rowan-Cabarrus. “While it’s not possible for every program, our overarching goal is to be available and accessible to students. That’s why our students can now earn 14 degrees completely online. It’s why the GED classes are offered morning, afternoon, evening, online and at multiple locations across the college’s service area.”

Students work at their own pace, so the time to complete a section of the GED may take weeks or months based upon the individual readiness for the test.

“The GED test opens the door to college and better jobs. It gives the graduate the respect they deserve, and the satisfaction of earning a high school credential with the hope that they will continue with their education,” said Connor.

“We are committed to helping the people of Rowan and Cabarrus counties gain the skills they need to become employable,” said Spalding. “In addition to free GED classes, we also offer free classes that prepare them to take the WorkKeys assessment to earn the nationally recognized Career Readiness Certificate (CRC). Armed with these two credentials, an individual’s chances for employment are greatly improved.”

Unfortunately, this reduction of price cannot be retroactive. If a student has already paid full price to take all four tests, that student would not receive a reimbursement. A student who is paying for individual tests would pay the lower price for any test he/she takes after the rate changes.

For more information about the GED program at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please call 704-216-3510.

Posted in Career Readiness Certification, Corporate and Continuing Education, GED | Tagged , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Hosts Annual SkillsUSA Southwest Reginal Competition

Area High School Students Compete in Leadership and Workplace Skills Assessment Activities

SALISBURY, N.C. — Rowan-Cabarrus Community College’s North Campus is typically a beehive of activity. However, it was busier than ever earlier this year, as the College hosted the SkillsUSA Southwest regional competition.

More than 100 high school students participated in more than two dozen categories — everything from identifying automotive tools to investigating at a crime scene and nailing a job interview.

SkillsUSA promotes leadership and skills assessments for students in trade and industrial classes, according to Glenn Barefoot, state director. There are some 100 categories offered in SkillsUSA competitions.

“It’s a great learning experience for the kids,” said Craig Pendergraft of the N.C. Department of Public Instruction. “They compete and show the best of what they can do.”

That was certainly the case in the carpentry department, where Brandon Blessing, Omar Mendoza and Christian Izaguirre of Monroe High School worked together at one table, the smell of fresh-cut wood permeating the air.

Teacher Greg Evans was quick to instruct Christian making a straight cut with his saw. Evans brought 13 students to the competition, the majority of whom were participating in carpentry activities.

Some 20 students from automotive classes at Providence High School were on hand, all attired in blue short-sleeved oxford shirts embroidered with the SkillsUSA logo and the words “Providence High Automotive.”

The students completed tests in auto 1, automotive service technology, automotive tool identification, aviation maintenance technology, motorcycle service technology and power equipment technology. Scores of Rowan-Cabarrus students served as proctors and assisted with the testing.

Thelancy Price, an engineering and drafting teacher at Providence High School, accompanied the team.

“I wanted to come and see what it’s all about,” she said of the competition.

Upstairs, the scene was a bit quieter — dead quiet, to be exact.

Kristina Miller, student ambassador for Rowan-Cabarrus, lay on the floor in the crime scene investigation classroom, the victim of an apparent “murder.” Above her, three students from A.L. Brown High School were discussing the clues around the case.

Eddie Kluttz of the China Grove Police Department peppered the trio with questions. Also lobbing inquiries was Kim Boling, the college’s program chair for criminal justice and emergency management.

“You may have to present this scenario to 12 jurors,” Kluttz said of the evidence being collected. “You will never get a second opportunity to visit the crime scene as it is now. You have your notes, your sketches and your photographs.”

Outside the door, Catherine Escuerdo was waiting with two other students of the Phillip O. Berry Academy of Technology for their chance at the forensics activity.

Escuerdo said that the SkillsUSA team meets monthly at her school, a magnet school in Charlotte.

“You can choose any competition you want,” said Escuerdo, a senior, who takes a class in forensics. “I like the competition. It takes you out of your comfort zone.”

Other tests being offered at the Rowan-Cabarrus site included architectural drafting, computer maintenance technology, cosmetology, drafting, electronics technology, firefighting, medical terminology, web design, welding and more.

For more information about SkillsUSA, visit www.skillsusanc.org. For more information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

Read More »

Posted in High School Programs, Job and Skills Training | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Board Calls on North Carolina General Assembly to Reinvest Funds Generated from Efficiencies

ROWAN-CABARRUS BOARD ANNOUNCES SUPPORT FOR SEVERAL LOCAL AND STATE INITIATIVES

SALISBURY, N.C. — The Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Board of Trustees recently passed a resolution of support for a statewide campaign for community colleges.

The resolution calls on the North Carolina General Assembly to reinvest the developmental dividend efficiencies, as well as non-recurring funds in the current budget, and enable support for the strategic priorities which are critical for North Carolina’s economic success: close the skills gap and increase the quality of educational and training programs.

“We are putting taxpayers back to work in better careers. We are closing the skills gap for employers, creating opportunities for job creation and retention. We are a great value, saving money for North Carolina families,” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of Rowan-Cabarrus.

Community colleges have worked hard to improve efficiencies over the last few years. One area of substantial improvement is the developmental math program. When students who are not ready for college-level math arrive at a community college, they need to take developmental, non-credit classes to prepare for college math. Sometimes the areas in which students need improvement are targeted and simply brushing up on fractions or algebra would solve the student’s problems. Instead of taking semesters of courses, this new developmental math program focuses on improving core areas of weakness and moving students into college-level math as soon as possible.

“Both the Governor and the General Assembly have encouraged agencies to look for efficiencies,” said Spalding. “Community colleges have made great strides forward. The funds we are asking to reinvest in other priorities come from savings we have generated.”

The campaign, The Developmental Dividend: Reinvest $36.8 Million in NC Community Colleges, splits funds between two different initiatives. Governor Pat McCrory has given a very strong endorsement to this proposal stating that he wants legislators to allow North Carolina’s 58 community colleges to retain and repurpose money they have saved to train more students in high-demand fields so their region’s employers can hire for hard-to-fill positions.

“Many businesses tell us that we need more graduates in certain degrees and certain specialties, and we need to reward our schools for doing just that,” the governor said in a recent interview.

Reinvesting the developmental dividend efficiencies, as well as non-recurring funds in our current budget, will enable support for the strategic priorities that we all agree are critical for North Carolina’s economic success: closing the skills gap and increasing the quality of educational and training programs.

Closing the Skills Gap – $16.8 million of the developmental dividend savings would go toward increased funding for the highest-cost curriculum programs and short-term, credential-focused courses that prepare students for immediate employment in fields with demonstrated skills gaps such as health sciences, engineering, construction, manufacturing, transportation, and biotechnology fields.

Workers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields play a direct role in driving economic growth. A recent Brookings report cites that there are many STEM jobs that require less than a bachelor’s degree. In fact, “half of all STEM jobs are available to workers without a four-year college degree, and these jobs pay $53,000 on average – a wage 10 percent higher than jobs with similar educational requirements,” according to the Brookings study.

Increasing Quality – $20.1 million would ensure quality instruction and student services by raising the level of support for all instruction. These reinvested funds would enable colleges to determine local solutions for improving student success and meeting industry needs.

While the portion of these funds that the College would receive cannot yet be determined, Rowan-Cabarrus usually receives about four percent of the state community college budget.

“We urge the N.C. General Assembly to support North Carolina’s economic recovery by reinvesting $36.8 million in the state’s community colleges,” said Dakeita Vanderburg-Johnson, chair of the College’s legislative committee. “Rowan-Cabarrus Community College in particular has worked very hard to provide high-quality, affordable education to our citizens. They need and deserve our support.”

The campaign also calls for raises for faculty and staff. Community college faculty and staff – the keys to successful student outcomes – continue to be paid significantly less than national and regional averages.

“In any other industry, paying people what they’re worth in terms of education and experience is a no-brainer. For some reason, educators are consistently underpaid, even though they contribute much to the country’s long-term economic prosperity,” said Carl M. Short, chair of the College’s Board of Trustees.

“Community college faculty and staff continue to be paid significantly less than national and regional averages. North Carolina’s average faculty salary ranks 11th in the 16-state Southeast Regional Education Board area and 41st nationally. We ask the General Assembly to provide the funds to support all educators in North Carolina with a salary that reflects the value they bring to our students and our community,” said Spalding.

Providing the region with exemplary public higher education that anticipates and supports economic and workforce development while increasing, improving and automating services and curriculum programming is a top priority for the College.

“The reality is that we are not immune to the tough economic times. Our resources from the state have continued to decline year after year. Like many public organizations, we are also seeking private philanthropic resources,” said Spalding. “We’ve worked hard to bring millions of federal and state dollars into our community through grants and collaborative partnerships. We cannot achieve our goal of strengthening our region through state-of-the art educational and innovational career training without adequate resources.”

The three resolutions include support for:

  • The renovation of a Cabarrus educational facility for cosmetology and related programs to replace the existing rental space at Cloverleaf Campus,
  • A November 2014 Cabarrus County bond referendum, and
  • A General Assembly campaign entitled “Support North Carolina’s Economic Recovery by Reinvesting Funds in the State’s Community Colleges.” 

“During recent years of economic turmoil, Rowan-Cabarrus has been a prominent force in attracting and leveraging federal, state and local resources to improve programs and services for the community while ensuring that displaced workers and other citizens receive the training they need to succeed in the workplace. It is essential that the College receives the community support and resources needed to continue on this path and fulfill its stated mission of public higher education,” said Short.

For more information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

Posted in Board of Trustees, Office of the President | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Holds Successful STEM Open House for 500

College welcomed the community for a fun, interactive event showcasing the College’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) programs

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — Rowan-Cabarrus Community College was proud to host its third annual STEM Open House at the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) earlier this month.

“The STEM Open House was a true celebration of science, technology, engineering and math,” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of Rowan-Cabarrus. “One of my goals since coming to Rowan-Cabarrus is to increase the breadth and depth of our STEM education. I fully believe that everyone should be interested in STEM – and that it’s critical that we embrace these subjects. America used to be the leader in technology and innovation. It’s time for us to reclaim that role.”

Approximately 500 members of the community visited the STEM Open House. The STEM Open House was a fun, interactive event for the community showcasing the College’s science, technology, engineering and math programs.

The College hosted dozens of interactive exhibits for kids and adults of all ages to dazzle the senses and stir curiosity for all things STEM. Attendees were able to perform DNA extraction in the College’s science labs, operate robots, and even engage in activities that created fun products by applying scientific and engineering principles in collaboration with technology and mathematics.

“We hope to reach as many as we can with our message, and that is to make science friendly, approachable and fun,” said Dr. Carol A. Scherczinger, dean of the College’s science, biotechnology, mathematics and information technologies. “Research has shown that opinions toward STEM subjects are formed early. Our purpose is two-fold: to recruit students to the College and also to provide a public service, to make STEM enjoyable and approachable.”

The exhibits were extremely diverse – visitors made and launched their own rockets, tested their skin for germs and learned about the science of investigating a crime scene. Visitors learned about DNA extraction, the complexity of balancing pH in dying hair and the science of firefighting. Several microscopes gave participants a peek at specimens like the wing of a fly and visitors tested their passwords against cyber criminals.

The College’s nursing programs host an annual health fair that was incorporated into the STEM Open House. Faculty utilized displays to educate the community about the dangers of smoking and the importance of nutrition.

“Holding this event at our building on the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) made a lot of sense. Our NCRC building is the home of our biotechnology and nursing programs – two of our most STEM intensive curricula,” said Spalding. “If you haven’t had a chance to visit the facility before, I encourage you to do so!”

The target audience for this open house was broader than traditional open houses hosted by the College. In addition to recruiting traditional-aged prospective students, the College aspired to host younger children (elementary and middle school aged) with their parents. Local K-12 public schools brought in buses of students; homeschool students and families were also in attendance.

The STEM Open House was held in conjunction with the statewide NC Science Festival focused on engaging the younger generation in science. Events across the state were designed to bring science to life for students and their parents.

For more information about next year’s event, please contact Dusty Saine (704-216-7105, dusty.saine@rccc.edu). For more information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

Read More »

Posted in Center for Teaching and Learning, Office of the President, Science, Biotechnology, Mathematics and Information Technologies | Tagged , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Steps into Culture for 1,000+

Free, family-friendly event developed by Rowan-Cabarrus faculty offered music, drama, literature and fine arts

CONCORD, N.C. — An infusion of culture, music, drama, literature and fine arts descended upon Concord on April 4 thanks to Rowan-Cabarrus Community College.

This year’s event, entitled Step into Culture, was a collaboration of Rowan-Cabarrus Departments of Fine Arts and English. It was held at the Clearwater Artist Studios and Gallery in downtown Concord.

“Many of our students at Rowan-Cabarrus are managing family responsibilities, career, and the demands of their studies. Consequently, they may not have the time or means to appreciate literature and the fine arts,” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of the College. “Step into Culture was a special one-day event that we created to make sure that our students have an opportunity to engage in activities and celebrations focusing on literature and fine arts.”

Students were encouraged to take short videos of the day’s events and share them on social media. The clips will be used to document the event and publicize future initiatives.

Performances included student drama demonstrations, directed by instructors Heather Wilson and Tommy Bradley and songs performed by the College’s chorus, directed by instructor Caroline Simyon. In the fall, the College will offer four levels of the chorus class. A poetry slam and “Open Mic” performances gave students an opportunity for impromptu engagement.

As part of the event, the creative writing award winners were honored and asked to present. The winners were:

* Poetry: “The Rest of Us” by Dylan Hull

* Fiction: “The Deal” by Sarah Di Musto

* Creative Non-Fiction: “A Memory We Fear” by Allyson Young* Academic Writing: “A New Leaf” by Kristi Westphal

“The piece of poetry was inside of me; it didn’t really come from anywhere, but I found it inside of me and put it down on paper,” said Hull, a 2011 graduate of East Rowan High School. Hull will graduate from Rowan-Cabarrus in May and continue his education at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro this fall.

“I’ve become more interested in different kinds of literature since coming to Rowan-Cabarrus,” said Hull. “My experience in Creative Writing II with instructor Ginger Fox was my favorite class. We were forced to bring a piece of work to the table and have it critiqued.”

Hull has been writing for 8 years and is a member of the Tiki Island Writing Group.

The Impulse Art Exhibition included artwork from 50+ students and College instructors. The show was open to any current student at Rowan-Cabarrus and included paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, videography and digital artworks.

“The exhibition is a great opportunity for students to share their creative work with the community,” said Jenn Selby, program chair of the Department of Fine Arts and instructor of photography and visual arts at Rowan-Cabarrus. “They love talking about their work and it benefits them professionally.”

Some students, like John Morro participated in several aspects of the day’s events. Morro had artwork on display in the gallery and he performed in both the chorus and drama shows.

In particular, one participant in the Impulse Art Exhibition has benefited from her time studying the fine arts at Rowan-Cabarrus.

“If I didn’t come to Rowan-Cabarrus, I wouldn’t have pursued an art career,” said Amelia Thomas, who will be graduating in May and continuing her education at the University of North Carolina’s School for of the Arts. Getting into the University of North Carolina’s School for of the Arts is extremely competitive. Thomas, a Cabarrus-Kannapolis Early College student, will study in the film program.

The Department of Fine Arts plans to offer an Associate in Applied Science degree in Advertising and Graphic Design in the fall. Also this fall, the College will offer new music and drama specializations within the AFA program. Everything from chorus classes to the history of rock music to American musical theater will be available. Additionally, the program, working closely with the NC Music Hall of Fame, has developed an introduction to jazz class.

“When the degree first started, the primary focus was on the visual arts, but the College is working toward expanding the degree program to better include the performing arts,” said Selby, who co-chaired the development of Step into Culture.

The Step into Culture event was free and open to the entire community.

“Step into Culture was a diverse, cultural experience with music, live demonstrations, poetry, spoken word, a student art gallery, food trucks and vendor tables, a sense of community, and more,” said Jenny Billings Beaver, chair of English, Developmental Reading and English and ACA (academic-related) courses at Rowan-Cabarrus. She also co-chaired the development of Step into Culture. “I couldn’t be more proud of our faculty and staff who made this event possible for our students and the community.”

The event was sponsored in part by the Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Foundation. NOMAD Aquatics and Fitness, Pearson Education, and Barnes and Noble are providing in-kind donations. The Step into Culture event was held in collaboration with the Cabarrus Arts Council, the City of Concord and the Clearwater Artist Studios and Gallery, and the Gibson Village Association.

Additionally, the College was proud to host Step into Culture in conjunction with the annual Salisbury Sculpture Tour. In recent years, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College has been honored to host at least one sculpture from the tour and has continued its participation this year. This year the North Campus hosts a sculpture by Chassity Miller, a Greensboro-based artist.

Several local food trucks provided refreshments for participants including Goldfinger’s Funnel Cakes, Hot Box Next Level Street Food, SweetCakes Custom Cakes, Nokie Thai, and Kona Ice.

For more information about future events like Step into Culture, please contact Jenny Billings Beaver (704-216-3797) or Jenn Selby (704-216-3820). For additional information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

The College is currently registering students for the summer 2014 semester. Classes begin on May 21. For more program information and course descriptions, please see the Rowan-Cabarrus website – www.rccc.edu – or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

The Impulse Art Exhibition at Clearwater Artist Studios and Gallery will be on display through May 3, 2014.

Read More »

Posted in Academic Programs, RCCC Foundation | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

“Should I Get Linkedin?” – New Workshop for Job Seekers

College provides free programs for the unemployed or under-employed

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — The R3 Center is offering numerous career development workshops, resume clinics in April for adults in Rowan and Cabarrus counties. Workshops and clinics are provided free-of-charge.

Services include individual career coaching, career building and job seeking workshops, Employability Labs where clients can utilize a computer lab for their work search, classes designed for quick skill building and Career Readiness Certification. Services are now available in both Rowan and Cabarrus Counties.

“We are really excited to offer one of our new workshops ‘Should I Get LinkedIn?’ this month. Many job seekers are utilizing the internet in their works search, but have questions about what sites are most useful,” said Keri Allman, director of R3 Career Services. “In this workshop we will discuss how you can create an online brand that will promote your abilities and accomplishments effectively to employers. We will discuss networking on social media platforms and take an in-depth look at LinkedIn.”

The “Should I Get LinkedIn?” workshop will be held on Thursday, April 10 at 9:30 a.m. at the College’s R3 Center in Kannapolis.

R3’s mission is built on three Rs – a refocus on individual skills and interests, retraining and further education, and partnering with other workforce development agencies to secure career-oriented re-employment.

New Client Launch is an orientation workshop for persons who have never attended an R3 workshop or taken advantage of its other services. New Client Launch appointments are available Monday-Friday and can be made by calling 704-216-7201.

The calendar also includes the following workshops held at the R3 Career Center in Kannapolis:

* Identifying Your Career Options – 11:00 a.m. on April 8, 2 p.m. on April 24;

* Interview Techniques – 11 a.m. on April 3, 2 p.m. on April 22;

* Networking Methods – 9:30 a.m. on April 17;

* Stand Out from the Competition – 9:30 a.m. on April 1, 2 p.m. on April 29;

* Looking for Work at 50+ – 11 a.m. on April 22, 2 p.m. on April 22;

* Looking for Work with a Criminal Record –11 a.m. on April 17;

* Letter Writing for the Job Seeker – 11 a.m. on April 15;

* Online Job Hunting Beginners – 9:30 a.m. on April 8;

* Should I Get LinkedIn? – 9:30 a.m. on April 10;

* Meet the Employers – 2 p.m. on April 10.

R3 Career Services helps adult workers assess their skills, aptitudes, training and academic credentials, and future career interests to develop an action plan for career growth. The Center will also offer multiple resume clinics to help job searchers improve their current resume or create a new one from start to finish. Please call to reserve a seat. The resume clinics are scheduled for:

* 9:30 a.m. on April 3 and 15;

* 11:00 a.m. on April 24;

* 2 p.m. on April 8.

R3 Career Services also offers short-term training classes starting in April and May.

Some students will qualify for tuition waivers based on income and employment status.

Please call 704-216-7201 for more information and to learn how to register.

GPS 2 Success – Cabarrus Business & Technology Center

* April 22-May 8 (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Computer Skills for the Worker – Cloverleaf

* April 1-May 1 (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) 12-3 p.m.

Computer Projects for the Worker – Career Connections

Pre-requisite: Computer Skills for the Worker or prior HRD computer course

* April 1-May 1 (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) 8:30-11:30 a.m.

Computer Projects for the Worker – Cloverleaf

Pre-requisite: Computer Skills for the Worker or prior HRD computer course

* April 1-May 1 (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday) 8:30-11:30 a.m.

Keyboarding – Career Connections

* Open enrollment for classes held on Mondays and Wednesdays

Keyboarding – Cloverleaf

* Open enrollment for classes held on Mondays and Wednesdays

Employability Lab

* Walk-ins are welcome at any of our locations during lab hours! Pace yourself in this open lab designed with the job-seeker in mind.

o R3 Center – Monday-Thursday 12-4 p.m.;

o Cloverleaf – Monday-Thursday 8 a.m-4 p.m.; Mondays and Wednesdays 5:30-9:30 p.m.;

o Goodwill Career Connections – Monday-Thursday 8 a.m-4 p.m.;

o Rowan-Cabarrus Community College North Campus – Wednesday-Thursday evenings 5:30-9:30 p.m.;

“The Employability Lab is a great edition to R3, because our clients will be able to work with an instructor on tools they are learning in R3 workshops and their individual coaching sessions,” said Allman. “In the lab, clients will also be able to work on a certification that helps recognize an individual’s current skill set called Career Readiness Certification.”

R3 Career Services partners with other workforce development agencies, including the Centralina Workforce Development Board, JobLink Career Centers of Cabarrus and Rowan counties, N.C. Department of Commerce- Division of Workforce Solutions, and other area community colleges.

R3 Career Services are offered at the following locations:

* R3 Center – 200 West Ave. | Kannapolis

* Cabarrus Business & Technology Center (CBTC) – 660 Concord Parkway N. | Concord

* Rowan-Cabarrus North Campus – 1333 Jake Alexander Blvd. S. | Salisbury

* Goodwill Career Connections – 1923 South Main St. | Salisbury

* Cloverleaf Extension Center – 942 Cloverleaf Plaza | Kannapolis

 

For more information about the R3 Career Services and its services and programs, please call 704-216-7201, or visit the Center’s website at www.rccc.edu/r3/.

Read More »

Posted in Career Readiness Certification, Job and Skills Training, R3 Center, Small Business Center | Tagged , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Turns Gamers into Budding Developers with Game Design, Mobile App Development

Students learn cutting edge simulation and programming skills; new offerings in mobile app development and graphic design

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — These days, just about anyone can play a video game, but not everyone has the skill to actually design a game. This summer, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College will embark on its fourth year of ever-expanding Tech Camps to help students imagine, plan, design and create their very own game. Additionally, offerings have expanded to include mobile app development and graphic design.

The Tech Camps are designed to excite and inspire young minds as they explore their interests and consider career options for the future.

“Game development is being implemented in many different types of industries and professions. Simulation and design are already being used in Fortune 500 companies for education, training and management modules,” said Ian Stevens, associate dean of information technologies. “The expansion of game design development techniques within all industries will eventually be inevitable.”

Rowan-Cabarrus developed the Tech Camps as an introduction for students to the world of computer programming.

“These budding developers often don’t even realize they’re learning important transferrable skills and concepts they must eventually master to succeed in the competitive global IT workforce – things like object-oriented and event-driven programming, agile development, graphic interface design, idea sharing, peer review, revisioning, presentation, and, above all, confidence,” said Zach Hubbard, camp coordinator. “Students leave having completed a game in a week that would have taken seasoned developers from earlier generations a year to develop.”

“This program shows that education and fun really can go together,” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of Rowan-Cabarrus. “I’m excited about the new ways Rowan-Cabarrus is reaching the community. From creating camps like this to developing more online courses, we are trying new and different ways to improve the access and availability of quality education. These gaming camps are further evidence of the College’s commitment to STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics – education.”

The camps cover a variety of topics: Xbox Game Development

June 16-19, June 23-26

Rowan-Cabarrus building on the North Carolina Research Campus

Instructor: Zack Hubbard, Harold Thompson, Corey McNeill, Joyce Camp

In this camp, we don’t play games, we make them! This summer camp will teach the fundamentals of computer programming through the use of Microsoft’s XNA Game Development Software Package. Each camper designs and creates a fully functional game. Basic computer literacy is necessary to be successful in this camp. Software: Visual Studio and the XNA Game Development Plugin.

Xbox Game Development Level 2

July 14-17

Rowan-Cabarrus building on the North Carolina Research Campus

Instructor: Zack Hubbard, Jessica Enlow

In this camp, students will build more complex games with more enhanced sounds, music, levels and gameplay. More complex game rules and more sophisticated games will continue to satisfy the camper’s need to be intrigued and to creative. Successful completion of the Xbox Game Development Level 1 is required as this camp will continue to expose students to programming techniques using XNA Game Development and Visual Studio.

Unreal Game Development

July 7-10

Rowan-Cabarrus building on the North Carolina Research Campus

Instructor: Stephen Umland

In this advanced course, campers who have honed their skills in previous game development camps can take their creativity to a whole new level using the open source software Unreal Engine 3. Unreal Engine 3 is a complete game development framework. Every aspect of the Unreal Engine 3 game development toolset has been designed with ease of content creation and programming in mind, with the goal of putting as much power as possible in the hands of artists and designers to develop assets in a visual environment with minimal programmer assistance. Intermediate game creation skills or completion of an Intermediate Game Development Camp is required. Each camper will receive individual attention in this camp which is limited to 20 attendees.

Android Mobile Apps Development

August 5-8

Rowan-Cabarrus building on the North Carolina Research Campus

Instructor: Zack Hubbard, Jessica Enlow, Corey McNeill

Have you ever wondered how you could create your own app? Develop and launch your own mobile app in four days! The Rowan-Cabarrus Mobile Apps Camp introduces students to the growing world of mobile apps, teaches them the technology and skill of creating apps from conception to development. Basic computer literacy is necessary to be successful in this camp. No prior experience creating apps is necessary. Each camper will receive individual attention in this camp which is limited to 20 attendees.

Graphic Design

July 21-24

South Campus, Concord

Instructor: Eric Tucker

Learn the basics of Adobe Photoshop in this graphics camp. Campers will gain the knowledge needed to develop images for game, web, photography, film, editing, graphic arts and advertising industries. They will learn how to make layer-based images, merge photos and use filters to create unreal effects. Basic computer literacy is necessary to be successful in this camp. Each camper will receive individual attention in this camp which is limited to 15 attendees.

Intermediate Graphic Design

July 28-31

South Campus, Concord

Instructor: Eric Tucker

Learn the more advanced functions of Adobe Photoshop in this graphics camp. Campers will gain the knowledge needed to develop images for game, web, photography, film, editing, graphic arts and advertising industries. They will learn how to modify layer-based images, merge photos and use filters to create unreal effects. Basic computer literacy is necessary to be successful in this camp. Each camper will receive individual attention in this camp which is limited to 15 attendees.

“We have some great offerings here at Rowan-Cabarrus that people just don’t know about,” said Dr. Rod Townley, vice president of academic programs. “The Tech Camps show students and parents that we offer innovative courses and programs that they might not think about otherwise.”

In addition to the camps, Rowan-Cabarrus also offers high school students tuition free courses for college credit through the Career & College Promise program allows students to simultaneously enroll in high school and college so that they can receive both high school and college credit for courses taken as part of the program.

“This tuition-free program for high school juniors and seniors gives them the opportunity to get a ‘jump start’ on a two-year or four-year degree while still in high school,” said Townley.

Rowan-Cabarrus offers options for students to get a head start in careers like fire protection, criminal justice, machining, web technologies, welding and more. In addition the College offers college transfer and general education classes as part of the Career & College Promise program.

These courses are weighted just like honors classes, making them a great alternative to Advanced Placement courses.

For more information on the camps or IT offerings, please contact Ian Stevens, associate dean of information technologies, or Zack Hubbard, at techcamp@rccc.edu. For more information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu.

Read More »

Posted in Academic Programs, High School Programs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Announces Third Annual STEM Open House

IMG_0058 IMG_0029College invites community to interactive showcase of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math programs

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — Rowan-Cabarrus Community College invites people of all ages to its third STEM Open House at its facility on the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC).

On Friday, April 11, from 2-5 p.m., the College will welcome the community to a fun, interactive event showcasing the College’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) programs.

“Almost everything we do in life has STEM applications, but not everyone realizes it,” said Dr. Carol A. Scherczinger, interim dean of the College’s science, biotechnology, mathematics and information technologies. “STEM subjects are very concrete. Science deals with our natural and physical world. Technology has given us the iPads, smart phones and computers we use every single day. Engineering is all about building things. Mathematics ranges from financial decisions to gaming strategies, such as playing pool or engaging in games of logic.”

The College will have dozens of interactive exhibits for kids and adults of all ages to dazzle the senses and stir curiosity for all things STEM! The community will have the opportunity to make their own rocket, perform DNA extraction in the College’s science labs, and even engage in activities involving sculpture and crime scene forensics.

“The STEM Open House is a true celebration of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math,” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of Rowan-Cabarrus. “One of my goals since coming to Rowan-Cabarrus is to increase the breadth and depth of our STEM education. I fully believe that everyone can be interested in STEM – and that it’s critical that we embrace these subjects. America used to be the leader in technology and innovation. It’s time for us to reclaim that role.”

The College wants younger children to attend with their parents. The exhibits will be extremely diverse – everything from the complexity of balancing pH in dying hair to the chemistry of extracting DNA from strawberries and how to develop videogames to race cars and fire trucks.

“Holding this event at our building on the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) makes a lot of sense. Our NCRC building is the home of our biotechnology and nursing programs – two of our most STEM intensive curriculum,” said Spalding.

The College’s nursing programs will also hold their annual health fair in conjunction with the STEM Open House complete with education on health conditions and opportunities to get active and have blood pressure taken.

Surrounding public and private schools are busing in students for the occasion.

“The target audience for this open house is broader than it has been for open houses of the past. In addition to driving more traditional-aged prospective students, we also want younger children (elementary- and middle-school-aged) to participate with their parents,” said Scherczinger.

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College’s STEM Open House will be one of the many events occurring as part of the NC Science Festival taking place from March 28-April 13. Given that STEM is an important focus for Rowan-Cabarrus, the College has committed to play a large role in the NC Science Festival. Activities will focus on engaging the younger generation in science. Events across the state are designed to bring science to life for students and their parents.

For more information about this event or to bring a school group, please contact Dusty Saine (704-216-7105, dusty.saine@rccc.edu). The College’s location for the STEM Open House is on the North Carolina Research Campus at 399 Biotechnology Lane, Kannapolis. For more information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu.

Read More »

Posted in Academic Programs, Science, Biotechnology, Mathematics and Information Technologies | Tagged , , , , ,

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Partners with Microsoft for Free Certifications

Last year’s Microsoft Test Fest awarded nearly 350 free certifications

CONCORD, N.C. — In 2013, a unique partnership between Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and Microsoft provided nearly 350 new Information Technology (IT) certifications at no cost to students. This year, the College hopes to reach even more community members and students.

“Rowan-Cabarrus is pleased to partner with Microsoft and Certiport to offer the community the opportunity to become Microsoft certified at no cost! Certifications are expensive and that’s a barrier for some students,” said Dr. Carol S. Spalding, president of Rowan-Cabarrus. “Our faculty and staff are constantly looking for ways to reduce costs and increase opportunities available to promote student success. This partnership with Microsoft is a perfect example.”

The Microsoft Test Fest was a first-of-its-kind opportunity for the College. Microsoft donated all of the tests taken during the event. This year’s event will take place on Thursday, April 24, 2014 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4-7 p.m. This year’s event has been expanded to include Microsoft Office Specialist Test as well as Microsoft Technology Associate Exams.

“Each individual who tests will save about $50 per exam,” said Ian Stevens, associate dean of information technologies. “Additionally, of the 100+ people who attended last year, many walked away with more than one certification – therefore nearly 350 successful certifications were earned in just three short hours!”

In conjunction with Rowan-Cabarrus in-house testing center, the College will transform all of the Cabarrus Business & Technology Center’s (CBTC) computer labs into satellite testing locations for this year’s event. Faculty and staff will support the efforts by serving as test proctors. The College’s designated testing center is in the process of expanding services to offer more industry testing on-site.

“While some of the Microsoft tests are basic level certifications, acquiring these credentials puts students one step closer to a job,” said Stevens. “Employers tell our faculty that the first thing they identify to screen applicants is certifications. These certifications help applicants get their foot in the door. Of course, additional certifications and training are available at Rowan-Cabarrus for more advanced students.”

Prizes will be available and food will be provided by the College’s Student Government Association.

“Microsoft certifications validate what students learn in the classroom by proving that students have real world skills that are applicable to future jobs,” said Stevens. “The Microsoft Test Fest is ideal for individuals looking to validate technology skills and to differentiate themselves as part of the college or job application process.”

Those interested must perform five easy steps in order to become certified: 1. Navigate to https://www.rccc.edu/sbmit/testfest/ and pre-register for the Microsoft Test Fest.

2. Receive free testing resources within 24 hours of pre-registration.

3. Check-in at registration at least 30 minutes before the test.

4. Pass the test(s) and become a Microsoft Certified.

5. Celebrate test completion with food, fun and prizes!

The partnership with Microsoft provides students with vouchers to become certified in 23 different areas. The event is open to anyone that is high school age or older (a picture ID is required). The Microsoft Test Fest will be held at the CBTC facility located at 660 Concord Parkway, North, Concord.

The College will also be hosting a series of technology camps again this summer. More information will be available soon.

For more information about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, please visit www.rccc.edu or call 704-216-RCCC (7222).

 

Posted in Academic Programs, Job and Skills Training, Office of the President, Science, Biotechnology, Mathematics and Information Technologies | Tagged , , ,